SEARCH FINANCIAL SERVICES INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY SCIENCE INTERVIEWS

 

     

Data Privacy Day 2019

January 28, 2019

Last year, worrisome headlines jolted consumers into reality about  protecting personal data. A recent survey indicates that 90 percent of those polled were “very concerned” about their privacy. Our always-connected lives require that we understand how our data is collected, used and shared and what actions to take to better manage our personal information. In addition, businesses of varying industries and sizes must recognize that transparency builds trust and it is critical to communicate clearly, honestly and often about what happens to consumers’ personal information.

We are in an unparalleled age of technological growth. By 2020, there will be an estimated 24 billion internet-connected devices globally – which is more than four devices for every person. Consumers have an increased understanding about the importance of privacy and want to know how their information and is being used and protected. This new era of privacy has tremendous benefits; yet, coupled with these infinite opportunities are challenges. As businesses learn to extract value from and utilize data at a deeper level, it is essential for companies to be extremely conscientious about protecting personal information. For any organization, respecting consumers’ privacy is a smart strategy for inspiring trust and enhancing reputation and growth.

Data Privacy Day, led by the National Cyber Security Alliance (NCSA) in the United States, is built on the theme, “Respecting Privacy, Safeguarding Data and Enabling Trust.”  To generate awareness about the day,  NCSA will host a timely event, titled  A New Era in Privacy ‒ streamed live from LinkedIn in San Francisco, CA on Monday, Jan. 28. NCSA will convene leading experts from industry, government and nonprofits to discuss how to best bring this new dynamic into focus and address future challenges.

“As we continually share more data on our connected devices, businesses are collecting and using this personal information more than ever before. Just think about everything we do online – from healthcare and banking transactions to posting family vacation photos to pinpointing our location at any given time. Data Privacy Day provides an opportunity for everyone to encourage organizations to improve data privacy practices and inform consumers about the number of ways their information is being used,” said Kelvin Coleman, NCSA’s executive director. “In short, privacy is good for business. If companies protect data and respect privacy, they will earn the trust of their customers. It is, however, up to all of us to learn about and practice simple steps to help protect our personal information.”

Create a culture of privacy in your organization. Educate employees on the importance and impact of protecting consumer and employee information as well as the role they play in keeping it safe.

Top Three Tips to Build Trust

  • If you collect it, protect it. Follow reasonable security measures to keep individuals’ personal information safe from inappropriate and unauthorized access.
  • Be open and honest about how you collect, use and share consumers’ personal information. Think about how the consumer may expect their data to be used, and design settings to protect their information by default.
  • Build trust by doing what you say you will do. Communicate clearly and concisely to the public what privacy means to your organization and the steps you take to achieve and maintain privacy.

Advice for Consumers: Safeguarding Your Data and Managing Your Privacy

Personal info is like money: Value it. Protect it. Information about you, such as your purchase history or location, has value ‒ just like money.

  • Share with care. Think before posting about yourself and others online. Consider what it reveals, who might see it and how it could be perceived now and in the future.
  • Own your online presence. Set the privacy and security settings on websites and apps to your comfort level for information sharing. Each device, application or browser you use will have different features to limit how and with whom you share information.
  • Lock down your login: Your usernames and passwords are not enough to protect key accounts like email, banking and social media. Strengthen online accounts and use strong authentication tools like a unique, one-time code through an app on your mobile device.

Terms of Use | Copyright © 2002 - 2019 CONSTITUENTWORKS SM  CORPORATION. All rights reserved. | Privacy Statement